Growth through Repetition

It is bedtime for your child. As you tuck your child into bed, ready to read their bedtime story, the book that they chose is the same book you have read for the last 1,000 nights. Tonight is 1,001. Did you know that reading, rereading, and rereading the same story can actually foster a love of reading? When a child is learning to read, they might choose a favorite book and might want only that book. That is okay! When a child rereads the same book, they are acquiring: vocabulary, sight words, fluency, grammar, phonemic and phonological awareness, comprehension, and confidence in their reading skills. If your child loves nonfiction books, they are learning about the world and developing their curiosity process when reading. If your child loves fiction books, they are learning social stories, how to have back and forth dialog, and learning social cues in different situations.

Tips when reading the same book over and over:

  • Keep a positive attitude when reading the same book.
  • Offer to read more than one book so you can introduce new books into the routine.
  • For fiction books, ask questions about the pictures, how they connect to the story, what they wonder the character is thinking, and how they would react in the same situation?
  • For nonfiction books, ask questions about the pictures, how they connect to the world, what they find interesting, and why they like the topic?
  • Offer to share reading tasks. If your child is early in the process in reading, ask them to read certain words. If your child knows the story well, ask them to read a page. Eventually, your child will read to you.
  • Remember, you are helping your child how to learn to read. Diversity in books will happen later.

As you mentally prepare yourself to reread the same book tonight, remember that you are contributing to your child’s successful reading skills. If you would like more tips or get book recommendations, visit: www.readbrightly.com

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